Gutfeeling
FAQ

A fool may answer more questions in an hour
than a wise man can answer in seven years.
-English proverb
  1. Q. Will Gutfeeling help my sex life?
  2. Q. Do I have to work at achieving Gutfeeling, or will it come on its own?
  3. Q. Can I be a believer in an organized religion without being spiritual?
  4. Q. Can I be spiritual without belonging to an organized religion?
  5. Q. Do women have more Gutfeeling than men?
  6. Q. How does Gutfeeling differ from intuition, hunch, or instinct?
  7. Q. I have never had a Gutfeeling. How will I recognize one?
  8. Q. Is Gutfeeling culture?
  9. Q. What happens when Gutfeeling takes me over?
  10. Q. Why is Gutfeeling capitalized and spelled as one word?
  11. Q. Will Gutfeeling replace logic?
  12. Q. How can I learn to utilize Gutfeeling?
 
Q:   Will Gutfeeling help my sex life?
A:   It certainly should. In love and sex, intuition plays a much greater role than logic and analysis. How many times have you heard someone complaining that so-and-so is "not romantic"? For "romantic" substitute the word "intuitive." When you're in love, let yourself go. You'll discover how much Gutfeeling can do for you! (See also Love).
 
Q:   Do I have to work at achieving Gutfeeling, or will it come on its own?
A:   Yes, and no - and here's why. Gutfeeling, especially if you are not used to recognizing it, can be elusive. You have to learn to identify it before you can catch it. But the worst way to go about it is to say to yourself, "I can't feel Gutfeeling. I should be able to. Why can't I? Worry, worry worry...." All you're doing at that point is creating stress for yourself, with no results. (See also Growth).

Your first objective should be to identify a single Gutfeeling in yourself. Then, hopefully, more than one. Once you can recognize these intuitions, you will come to recognize what triggers them in you. That's when you start to use them more systematically. Then you can work at bringing them out and acting on them. The more of them you have, the easier they will emerge. Allow them to come out and depend on them as part of your thinking/feeling process. We are saying: "Let go, and they'll come to you." (See also Habits).

This is not a contradiction in terms. Think of athletes. They have to work hard to learn the skills they perform. Once they reach a certain level, however, they have to "relax into" the activities they are performing. It's the same with Gutfeeling. (See also Golf).

The working at it part is when you apply your analytical faculties to Gutfeeling. You can't analyze the feeling itself, but you can set it in a rational field. Ask yourself a question like, "If I don't follow my instinct, what will be the result?" Then list all the pros and cons. Balance your list. Make your decision. You will gain both the benefit of instinct and analysis.
 
Q:   Can I be a believer in an organized religion without being spiritual?
A:   Yes. Being a member of any organized religion does not guarantee spirituality. But spirituality is part of organized religion. In fact, without it, that religion would die out. What happens often, however, is that the rituals involved in organized religion strangle spirituality. True spirituality cannot be channeled in any "approved" manner. It has to come from within. (See also Religion).
 
Q:   Can I be spiritual without belonging to an organized religion?
A:   Yes again. Organized religion has no monopoly on spirituality. In fact, as stated at the beginning of this book, "Spirituality does not come from religion. Religion comes from spirituality." (See also Introduction).
 
Q:   Do women have more Gutfeeling than men?
A:   Not more, but more likely listen to it more often. Men are often raised to be macho, stiff-upper-lip, don't-cry individuals. This behavior training inhibits emotions and encourages men to ignore their feelings. Women are more often raised to pay attention to their feelings, and hence are more in tune with their emotions. It's not a hard-and-fast rule, but it's felt that women are "more intuitive" than men. This simply means they're more used to adding emotional content to their decisions than basing them, as men are supposed to do, on reason and logic alone. (See also Key for men only).
 
Q:   How does Gutfeeling differ from intuition, hunch, or instinct?
A:   In this book the words are used almost interchangably, although there are differences. Gutfeeling, intuition, and hunch are much the same thing. Instinct, however, is inbred. Your body does certain things whether you think about them or not. Your heart beats, you breathe, your blood circulates. You must remember to eat, but once having eaten your body does the rest without any intervention from you. Yet there is also a sense in which instinct is part of Gutfeeling. You can stop yourself from doing certain things we call instinctual so there is a Gutfeeling component to instinct as well. Think of the fight-or-flight response. It's automatic. But we can control it. When to control it is the question. Your Gutfeeling will give you hints. (See also Instinct).
 
Q:   I have never had a Gutfeeling. How will I recognize one?
A:   You probably have had a Gutfeeling, but have not recognized it as such. The thing to do is to watch for the tell-tale signs outlined below. And remember. There are none so deaf as those who will not hear.
 
Q:   Is Gutfeeling culture?
A:   Not really, if what you mean by culture is environment. But if you mean by culture that pattern of knowledge, belief, and behavior that makes us human, including our beliefs, attitudes, goals, and practices-then yes, Gutfeeling is a part of our culture.
 
Q:   What happens when Gutfeeling takes me over?
A:   Gutfeeling really doesn't "take you over." It's a feeling, an intuition, a "tingling in your fintertips", what Albert Einstein called "Fingerspitzengefuhl." Or a sudden sense that "there's more behind this than meets the eye". When you experience it, listen. Your subconscious is trying to tell you something. Have you ever experienced someone telling you something that you feel is slightly off-color, that it is not right, and it makes you feel uncomfortable? That's Gutfeeling. Your job now is to mark it, remember it, and come back to it when you're alone and can examine the feeling. It will tell you a lot about how to go on. (See also Gutfeeling).
 
Q:   Why is Gutfeeling capitalized and spelled as one word?
A:   Gutfeeling is an unintentional play on words. George and I were looking for a title for the book. We did not want to call it simply "Spirituality at Work." George suggested Gut Feelings. When I wrote it down I wrote it as one word - "Gutfeeling." George immediately recognized that the English word "Gut," which is another name for "intuition," is the same as the German word "Gut," which means "good". A combination of Good and Gut produces Good Feelings, and that's how it came about.
 
Q:   Will Gutfeeling replace logic?
A:   Never. In fact, too much Gutfeeling can mislead you. Use logic, analysis, and intuition together. Do your rational analysis. Make sure it holds together, as you would with any business plan or proposal. Then wait. Sleep on it. Try to get a "feel" for the way you think about it. That's where your Gutfeeling can tell you whether to "hold or fold." (See also Accounting).
Q:   How can I learn to utilize Gutfeeling?
A:   Remember the old words you learned at school about paying attention to traffic? Stop. Look. Listen. Then act. It's that simple and that complex.


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