THE BOARD OF TRADE OF METROPOLITAN TORONTO
B U S I N E S S
J O U R N A L
The Voice of the Metro Toronto Business Community 1995


The medium is the Message
HOW TO DELIVER A POWERFUL PRESENTATION

Standing up and giving a presentation isn't easy. Whether it's ten people or 200, you'll probably be nervous and you'll probably show it. The problem is your presentation will not will not be as powerful as if you were really in control.
     Well then, relax. Peter Urs Bender, one of the best, professional presenters in Canada delivered a recent seminar at The Board on, what else?........The Secrets of Power Presentations. Mr. Bender gives seminars to businesses in Canada, the United States and Europe. He's also the author of Secrets of Power Presentations, a Canadian best seller now in its fifth edition. The Business Journal was at his Board of Trade seminar, and we're please to pass on his tips to you.
     "Mastering presentation skills is no longer a must, it is a necessity" says Bender. "Without good presentation skills you could lose your prospect or your audience. And though you may not lose your job, you may not get a promotion." According to Bender, there are five key components to a successful, powerful presentation: Content, body language, equipment, the environment and preparation.

CONTENT, OR THE SPEECH
A great speech informs, entertains and activates. Information is important, but don't give too much; you'll overwhelm your audience. Entertaining your audience may be your toughest challenge. Whatever you do, don't tell a joke. It may fall flat or even offend somebody. Instead, tell a story that pokes fun at yourself. the call to action is the most important part of your speech. Communicate clearly and convincingly just what it is you want your audience to do. Inspire them to act on your message.

BODY LANGUAGE
EQUIPMENT
Visuals such as slides or overheads will make your presentation even more powerful. Following these basic rules will help. THE ENVIRONMENT
Get to know the room where you'll deliver your presentation. You may find that you want to make changes, and that's best done days rather than minutes before your presentation. To get the audience to sit in the front rows, mark the back row seats "Reserved". Or put out fewer chairs than you will actually need, and add others as the room fills. And as your audience starts to file in, keep the lights low. Turn them on completely just before you start. It's a little drama that will make your audience pay even more attention to your opening.

PREPARATION
Good preparation compensates for lack of talent. Failure to plan, combined with the absence of outstanding talent, can destroy your credibility. Prepare. Prepare. Prepare.

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